Friday, April 17, 2015

Aura Medicine


Medical science is always at odds with believers of divine healing, yet modern medicine is in itself miraculous. There are recorded cases of miraculous cures. We know that a healthy body can resist germs and disease, and psychiatrists teach that a healthy mind can, to an extent, keep the body healthy. It is known that stress and worry break down our bodily defenses, and that meditation is a good practice for managing them. 

The art of healing is by nature akin to the supernatural. The will to live is a very effective deterrent. Ancient healers did effect astonishing cures – did a deity intervene? Did the healing ritual emotionally effect recovery in the sick person? It is true that mental illness can cause physical ailment. If the process is reversed, could mental stability restore the body? 

There is a psychic factor to color. It is appealing, emotional, and inspiring; suggestive of something mysterious. The study of the human aura provides a clinical environment in which to gain knowledge about color and healing. The subject of human aura is not necessarily mystical. Even the most skeptical knows that the body radiates heat and odor. In the right circumstances this emanation can be seen. Photographers such as Carlo Van de Roer do biofeedback photographs of these emanations.


The human aura is affected by the condition of the body - by health or illness. To some mystics, astral light is a healing force, representing the divine deity shining from within. It is said that auras flow from holy places of the Orientals more so than from the temples of Christians, who disdain psychic phenomena.

Paracelsus stated the body has two substances – visible and invisible. Chaos of the visible produced disease. He would endeavor to re-harmonize it with contact of healthy bodies, to heal the sickness with needed elements from the presence of a person with a strong aura, sort of like a transfusion of vibration instead of blood.

An auric healer has three methods: thought transfer, influencing the patients aura, and encouraging the right emanations. The healer meditates on certain hues to build up his own aura, thus affecting the aura of his patient. This is a mental and spiritual process, not one using lights or colored material.

Certain colors are effective for particular dis-eases. For treatment of the nervous system violet and lavender produces soothing. Grass-green invigorates, and medium yellow and orange inspire. For the blood and organs, blue sooths, green invigorates, and bright reds stimulate. In case of fever think blue, for treatment of chills, red is the hue to use. 

To modern medical doctors the theories of the auric healer may seem ridiculous fantasy, nonetheless the aura cannot be ignored if the healing sciences are to practice what they preach. Any number of investigators of this phenomenon, no matter how skeptical, admit that simple colors surrounding the body are visible to the eye. In his book on the subject, George White explains that a  magnetic field exists around animals and plants and that this magnetic atmosphere must be characteristic of the vehicle it emanates from. Kirlian photography has documented these magnetic rays around both the living and the inanimate. White states that the color of the average aura is grayish blue, and that health and disease are evident in the aura. 

Walter Kilner, in The Human Atmosphere, approaches the subject with the scientific mind of a laboratory worker, shunning the more mystical aspects of aural light. He concludes that there is a visible envelope surrounding the human body, which has three parts. There is a narrow dark band, a very clear aura, and  one that is misty and without sharp edges. In a normal aura the radiating beams emanate at right angles, are electric in appearance, always shifting and changing. The color of health is bluish gray, tinged with yellow and red. Disease changes this to duller and grayer color. Kilner stresses that the shape of the aura is more important than its light quality. Many studies by Kilner and Oscar Bagnall were done in scientific manner; Bagnall used a special screen to observe the aura, rather than gazing at the person in a dark room. He divides the aura into two parts – inner and outer. He does agree that the healthy aura is bluish or grayish, and adds that bluer hues indicate finer intellects. Bagnall determined that no aura shines from a dead thing, whereas Kirlian photography endeavored to show that the magnetic field around all things remains for a time after it is dead. 

After much research with processes to sensitize the rods and cones of the eyes to certain colors, Bagnall theorized that nocturnal animals had ultra-violet vision and could see things invisible to humans. He believed that medicine and surgery would benefit from further study of the aura, that these streaming emanations have profound significance. He is convinced that the aura and its colors are an inherited quality, and would follow genetic laws.

John 1:4 says “...life was the light of men.” Ancient mystics worshiped light. They believed that light was divine, that it filled all living things, and that it brought with it knowledge of the divine. This is in accordance with practitioners of auric healing – that the divine light within life can be observed, and that it can be used to heal.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder


Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

    Symbology series:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols  
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Fairy Tales: 

A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid
The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Miracle Healing


In a discussion of magic we most certainly must mention what can and does bring great benefit to humankind. I speak of miraculous healings. This class of phenomena has great importance in all lines and has provoked controversies nowhere near resolution. 

If cures have taken place at Lourdes or in any other sanctuary of the church they are undeniably the work of the deity. Other cures that happen in other places have been called the work of the devil. Does the devil hold equal power to heal as does God? Wouldn't those who ask for healing and only profit from the “diabolical” benefit would be wrong to refuse? 


One related subject would be the history of Jansenism (a Christian theological movement in France around the 1700’s). Miraculous events are preserved in this engraving by Louis Carre de Montgeron. Francois de Paris was a Jansenist Deacon who died in 1727 and was buried at St. Medard in Paris. His tomb became a pilgrimage and many persons who went there reported miraculous healing, had ecstasies, or went into trances inspired dance similar to convulsions. Among the many cures effected there were blindness, nervous ailments, and paralysis. People flocked to this pale and would lay upon the tomb, crawl under its overhang, or reach through others surrounding it just to touch it. There were often more than 300 Swiss Guards who had much difficulty keeping order. Yet cures were a daily occurrence. 

The eighteenth century, so filled with doubt and skeptics also experienced most marvelous events. Decades after the tomb was ordered closed, people flocked to Mesmer’s magnetic tub, this wondrous object was invented by a German physician, inspired by William Maxwell who wrote: 

“Material rays flow from all bodies in which the soul operates by its presence. If you make use of the universal spirit by means of instruments impregnated with this spirit, you will thereby call to your aid the great secret of the Images. The universal machine is nothing but the vital spirit repeated in the proper subject.”


Mesmer conducted experiments with magnetism and its effects on the nervous disorders and observed that a magnetic force, similar to that which attracts iron to a magnet, existed in everything. He wrote “a mutual influence subsists between the celestial bodies, the earth, and the living bodies.” Thus he created the magnetic tub and miracle cures flowed from his consisting room in Paris. Were these of the devil? 

Mesmer’s tub created controversy. Believers saw powers similar to electricity at work which was then the fashion. Scientific detractors cried quackery, and theologians in their power seats, many vindictive in attitude, saw the work of the devil. Mesmer became known as a sort of magician whose doctrine was neither occult nor scientific, nor religious in nature.

Another miracle healing craze happened earlier in the 1600’s and was centered around the sympathetic powder. This discoverer, Sir Kenelm Digby, was later executed for his involvement with the Guy Fawkes gunpowder plot. The cure was for wounds, most especially from firearms, whereby a mixture of sulfuric acid powder and the victims blood  was mixed into a salve and put on the bandage – not on the person but simply on a bandage. It was said to have created a sympathetic union between the treated blood and the wounded person. This treatment became the rage in France. Digby spoke to a group of learned men explaining that “wounds were salved without need of touching them or seeing them...” All that was needed was blood from the wound. This process was published in a book where in it was recorded that when the Duke of Buckingham was wounded very seriously he sent for Digby to treat it. 

This miracle seems to be a kind of beneficent spell; action at a distance is experienced, as with the Death-Spell. The blood of the person is considered to be a living part of him – like the principle of vital spirits from the 17th century, and in accord with Rabbinical opinions which place the breath, or spirit of life, in a person’s blood. Affecting one affected the whole, which was in accord with all occult theories from Agrippa to Paracelsus. It is interesting that today scientists observe an extraordinary behavior of atoms in which even at astronomical distances what is done to one affects the other. Again, the devil?

In our literal and scientific culture perhaps we have lost our willingness to see the miraculous. Yet the very universe we live in is, to our finite minds, unexplainable; humans cannot explain anything, we can only observe and describe. Cause and effect. Perhaps this mind-set was prevalent in those who, centuries before, were surrounded by miracle healing.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder


Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

    Symbology series:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols  
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Fairy Tales: 

A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid
The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book

Thursday, April 9, 2015

The Double Life of Spells


Spells can be cast by sorcerers or witches. The word sorcery is derived from the word for “lots” or “spells”. There are two kinds – harmful and useful. This distinction clearly shows their double life, and the duplicity of the sorcerer; all powerful, hated and feared for the misfortune he can bring, being useful only to avert misfortune or ensure success. In this way the sorcerer could make money twice over. He could work mischief on some farmer who then got relief by paying cash, or if an illness or pest attacked a community the sorcerer was ready to provide a cure in return for payment. Sometimes he would undo the spells of another sorcerer, triggering a battle between them – the unlucky subject spell-bound, paying all the costs. 


Sorcerers and witches could stop ships at sea or keep windmills from working. They could dry up cows, stop corn from growing, spoiling the bread, freeze wine, caused strife among friends, cause epidemics, and raise storms. They would, if asked, stop bleeding of wounds, extract a bullet from a wound, cure maladies, or stop famine. By all accounts they had considerable reputation. This magical duo most often exercised their powers over storms and tempests in maritime Scandinavian countries. An illustration by Ziarnki depicts witches flying off over the sea to raise storms. In another by Magnus a witch empties her cauldron into the sea causing a frightful storm, making a ship flounder. Another work shows two navigators haggling with a sorcerer about the price of a rope with three knots, which he is holding. Winds are bound up in the knots, undoing them would release a breeze, some wind, or a tempest. In the background a sailor  awaits his fate on a sinking ship. Many methods were used to induce storms. Two witches could bring a downpour by holding a rooster over a flaming cauldron. The same could be accomplished by drawing a certain diagram, shutting a toad or spider in a pot, or reading a formula. 

An ancient manuscript shows a series of sacred pentacles depicting Chaldean and Hebrew letters in their particular shapes, colors, and characters, with directions for their use and knowledge of the art. One enabled earthquakes to be set in motion. A diagram of Solomon’s seal is surrounded by Psalm 18:7: “The Earth shook and trembled.” Within the circle and the triangles dividing it are groups of Hebrew letters and cabalistic characters which correspond to invisible powers; their interpretation is dubious to say the least. 

For a while an object called the Hand of Glory was popular. The Hand is shown in many books of witchcraft and found on the mantle of chimneys up which initiates fly. It is a particularly gruesome and evil charm, created from the human hand of a very bright person, preferably a genius. It is purported to render those who view it stupefied and motionless. There is also a way to shield yourself from its effects using a formula for which you would need a black cat, white hen, and screech-owl. The substance must be prepared during the dog-days. Alongside a sorcerers gruesome Hand of Glory is an equally grisly magic candle which enables him to find buried treasure. It’s secret was discovered by Jerome Cardan. It consists of using human tallow; it will sparkle and make noise when near treasure.

Casting spells on milk is still common among country dwellers. A witch will dry up the cows and get paid to reverse the spell. One could punish the witch, however, by boiling the cursed milk and striking the pan with a stick. The devil would deal blows to the witch accordingly, until she removed the spell. Sometimes a spell would cause blue milk, but this milk was always more abundant than good milk. A witch could also get milk from objects on a farm, most often an axe handle.

Certain spells were only profitable to sorcerers and gave them enviable advantages. Some could cross the sea on the surface of the water perched on a piece of wood, not unlike today’s water gliders. Once document – le Secret des Secrets – expounds on the secret of invisibility, a very disturbing idea. In this way sorcerers could be part of gatherings or enter houses undetected. This condition was obtained by reciting a certain prayer in Latin; a bat’s blood would be used to write certain characters, and then the prayer continues. Knowing the principles involved is required, and Latin must be used. According to several sorcerer’s Black-books it is possible to become invisible by carrying the heart of a bat, black hen, or frog under the right arm. If more elegance is required, a Ring of Gyges (a mythical object mentioned in Plato’s Republic) can be used, turning the stone in or out, to be seen or not. If you cannot see the ring in a mirror it has been manufactured unsuccessfully. 


A sorcerer could nullify spells cast by another, and if powerful enough would succeed in nullifying the other sorcerers powers, binding him with a counter-spell. A famous legend tells of  a cavern between two churches on an island. In the cavern is a shackled sorcerer awaiting his release to be provided by another sorcerer’s spell. In the sixteenth century this cavern was a place of superstitious terror – no one dared venture into it.  

Religion and magic can both be frightening or bring hope. Both promise healing and blessing. Both use fear to implement their goals; both exploit human fear of death. Spells offer a method of inflicting misery and death, or a recourse for resolution and hope, when all else fails.    

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder


Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

    Symbology series:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols  
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Fairy Tales: 

A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid
The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book

Monday, April 6, 2015

12 Dancing Princesses Revealed


Fairy tales are vehicles for the transmission of history from ages lost in the mist of time. Clues to the lives and traditions of our ancestors are embedded in layers of characters, symbols, and story. Numbers are symbolic in fairy tales, hinting at astronomical awareness of the culture originating the tales. The story of the Twelve Dancing Princesses has its roots in the astronomical knowledge of pre-history. Twelve is a particularly significant number, associated with the ancient division of the sky into 12 constellations. It is common also to describe the movement of heavenly bodies, which move forward and back – as “the dance.” Each planet’s dance is different.

In this story, there are 12 princesses who sneak out of their room every night, and when they return, their shoes are worn out from dancing. The king, beside himself, finally finds a hero to find out what the girls were up to. Twelve beautiful princesses slept in twelve beds in the same room, with doors locked securely. Each morning their shoes were discovered to be worn out as if they had been dancing all night. The king, desperate to discover their secret, offers a prize to the one who did, but failure meant death. Several princes fail, but a soldier tricks the twelve girls and follows them through a trap door in the floor, into twelve boats, down a river to a castle where, sure enough, the girls dance all night with twelve princes. The soldier retrieves a branch from each of three trees; one of silver, one of gold, and one of diamonds, and a golden cup, which he gives the king as proof.  

With roots in the astronomical knowledge of prehistory – some goes back 77,000 years – this tale tells of keeping of secrets (represented by the mysteriously worn out shoes, which represent a year) and getting to know the twelve zodiacal constellations (the princes they dance with). Together the princes and princesses make twenty-four, the number of hours in a day. A wonderfully enchanting story, it is filled with symbols and allegory. Time is illustrated by the river and boats, and the twenty-four characters “dance” with the mathematics necessary to measure time using the stars. It is one of many tales referring to “stories written in the sky,” which allude to ancient knowledge of seasons and natural cycles – stories embodied in the zodiac. The locked room holds the secrets of the ancient navigators. The garden of trees with gold, silver, and diamond leaves is similar to a garden in the  epic of Gilgamesh. The golden symbolizes the golden ball of sun, or the grail.


This wondrous tale is one of thousands that carry secrets and buried history from the world of once upon a time. All we need do is look, and we will see. 

Remember: Our perception of today rests upon our knowledge of yesterday. And our understanding of today determines our future. Learn about the past – build a better tomorrow.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder


Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

    Symbology series:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols  
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Fairy Tales: 

A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid
The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book