Sunday, March 29, 2015

The Power of the Ring


Rings come in all colors, sizes, styles, and prices. They are worn as a statement of power, sign of belonging, token of friendship, oath of loyalty, personal pledge, bond of marriage, symbol of slavery, and as just plain decoration. For centuries, the type of material a ring was made from, or the presence of a precious stone, let others know the wearer was in a high-class position in society. Peasants could not often afford such luxuries. Rings are a significant cultural and historical symbol for power, luck, and slavery. They have an ancient history of tradition and ritual, and have evolved through many cultures and civilizations.

In Greek mythology Prometheus is the first man to wear a ring, symbolizing the remnants of his chains upon his release. Punished for stealing fire from the gods, Prometheus was chained to the frosty Caucasus where a vulture pecked out his liver all day in an endless cycle. Although Zeus swore to keep him there eternally, eventually he forgave Prometheus, and commanded that he wear an iron ring to which a small fragment of Caucasus is fastened, so in a certain sense Prometheus continues to be bound to the rock. Frey, the Norse god of Peace and pleasure, possessed a ring from which other gold rings dropped continuously. An arm band, or ring, was worm by Thor. Oaths were taken on it, representing pledges to an older god of law and order. North of Stockholm, in 2007, archeologists found 65 inch amulet rings which were used for the swearing of oaths. These may be the rings of Ullr, in the eddic poem “Atlakvida.”

Stories from many cultures and eras feature rings of great power. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings is a modern example. Rings in general have a deeply rooted magical significance, such as in the story of The Magic Ring, published in 1861. Enchanted rings figure in many ancient folk tales, sometimes linked to fish – a symbol of higher knowledge and wisdom – as in The Fish and the Ring. Incantations and spells for the protection of the wearer of rings are common motifs; many legends and folktales include rings with magical force or hidden powers. Invisibility, immortality, healing, and the granting of wishes are commonly afforded by a ring worn on the finger.

A ring represents the power of royalty. A king's ring given to someone could pardon or protect that person from destruction. Rings represent power, sometimes delegated through a signet ring; a document from a king marked with the emblem on his ring carried with it the power of his throne. This is where we can see the origin of the symbolism of rings, both magical and mundane. To make this connection we must decode the rod and cord depicted in images of kings from antiquity. If you look, you will find many more examples.

In each image there is a rod, and a circle. The circle represents the cord of the Vanir astronomers, and the rod is their megalithic yardstick (Duncan-Enzmann). Knowledge of how to use these tools created the ability to predict seasons, measure the movement of the heavens, divide time, and calculate longitude. With longitude you can navigate the world’s oceans, and they did that ca 4500 BC. The symbols for the rod and cord became symbols for power, and fierce protection of the knowledge of how to use these tools. This is a logical basis for the associations of power, loyalty, and ownership that are attached to rings. There is a great article in Working Tools for Master Masons magazine in the January 2013 issue about the rod and the cord.

Today rings are commonly worn as a tokens of love and marriage, but this practice also has roots in the rituals of gods and goddesses of old. Pagan stories tell of youths becoming bridegrooms of Venus by a ceremony of rings. Gold rings of great value were used in sea goddess marriage celebrations in middle ages. Roman betrothal rings were tokens of legal vows. In contemporary traditional and religious ceremonies – Christian and otherwise – the wedding rings are blessed by a minister or priest, still imbuing the rings with protective powers.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

    Symbology series:

Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols 
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Fairy Tales: 
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn

A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid

The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book


Thursday, March 12, 2015

Busting the Caveman Myth






Knowledge is fickle. One day something is true and the next it is ridiculous. Discerning truth from deceit, lies, or just plain lack of knowledge is not as easy as we think it is sometimes. A colleague of mine speaks of statistics this way: Math, he says, is math. But always remember, figures may not lie, but liars figure. Especially smart liars. Math not being my strong subject I must rely on others to get my information, and hope they are not good liars.

One example of misinformation, both deliberate and ignorant, is about “cavemen.” Growing up I saw lots of pictures of the Ice Age, prehistoric man, and life before “civilization,” (that is when we became civilized). One in particular was an image of a brute with a beard and long hair wearing animal skin with a club over one shoulder. With his other hand he drags a female into his cave by her long hair. “They didn't talk real language then,” I was told. “They grunted to communicate. We have come a long way since then.”



Another familiar scene was a group of fur-skin clad people sitting around a fire in a cave with bones on the cave floor all around them. They were eating like we might today, holding a turkey leg in our hands and tearing the meat off the bone with our teeth, minus the table and napkin. And I am sure it was not turkey.




This community also had artists. They would take fur and wrap it around a stick, dip it into some natural plant juice and draw pictures on the wall. They must have been pretty good artists; some of their work was very large – 20 feet or so, and can still be seen today, thousands of years later. These creative souls were of service to the tribal leaders who needed to placate the spirits for a good hunt, and help train young boys to recognize the prey when they were old enough to join in.




Mammoth hunting was depicted as well; a humongous beast with long ivory tusks being attacked by a dozen or so males with crude spears. Some of the spears were already sticking out of the animal’s hide like porcupine quills. This would be their food supply, so they were quite motivated to succeed and take the giant down. Sharp stone tools would be used to butcher this mastodon and provide the clan’s food and hides. 



Then there is man and fire. Images abound of early man sitting in front of a pile of sticks, twirling another stick between his hands in an attempt to light a fire. Have you ever actually tried that? There is an art to using fire; my dad taught me how to build a proper campfire, and arrange the logs in the fireplace. Starting fires (without modern matches or lighters) is tricky. The Vestal Virgins of ancient Europe were responsible for making sure the fires never went out. Because they are hard to light. Sharing a smoldering coal with someone whose fire had gone out was a precious gift. Prometheus paid an eternal price for sharing fire with early humankind, it must have been important. 



These stories and images were in my history books, on display in museums, in art, and on television. I was quite fascinated with the primitive form of social life I saw. Our historians worked very hard collecting information about our caveman ancestors, and it was all there in my school history book. I have to confess that I sat often and considered how I would teach the brute a lesson for dragging me by the hair, and then was quite thankful that I did not live in those beastly animalistic times. But then I realized that it had to be that way, after all, he had the future of humanity in his mind, babies must be made. “They managed to survive,” I was told, “otherwise humanity would have disappeared and we would not be here.” I said thank you to the ancient cavemen for being clever enough to survive the women they pissed off. 

I have come to call these stories the Cave Man Myths. Not really fair to the word mythology, which does not really mean “things untrue” but has come to communicate that in our modern world. Like the Mythbusters of TV, let me address each of them with science, geology, climatology, dendrology, history, and translations of inscriptions from Magdalenian picture language (12,500 BC). 

Some things to know about the Ice Ages: 

There is a reason we call them that. It was not just cold. It was so cold in some eras that most of humanity died. In between those frigid, iron-old periods were warmer periods we call the Ice Ages when it was only 50 below zero, plus wind chill, for several months, then just warm enough to let the grass grow for a few months. For centuries it was like that. There was not much growing, it is hard to cover the earth with green stuff when it is mostly winter. The earth was covered with prairies of many-colored long grasses, low shrubs, Dryas, and a few trees. The great forests did not grow till after the Hudson Bay slush-out at 6000 BC when it warmed up. (for more information about history see: Symbology: Decoding Classic Images, Michelle Snyder, available at Amazon)





How did they make fire? Joseph Campbell published an image of a fire-bow, used to start fires. It is like a bow and arrow bow, except the string is wrapped around the upright stick and the bow is used in a sawing motion to twirl the stick faster than ever could be accomplished by hand. To protect the hand a stone is placed between the palm of the hand and the twirling stick. The pile of flammables was also a science. Horse and Mammoth poop was dried and used for fire, wood was scarce, and dried patties burn longer and hotter than wood. (Buffalo Chips were for the same purpose on the prairies in our own US history). Dried brush was also in the pile. How to use the fire-bow and start and maintain fires is etched onto the palm-stone. Smart, inscribing directions for how and when to use the tool right on the tool. The Magdalenians did that a lot.

 Fire-bow;   Palmstone, bottom;   Palmstone, top, inscribed

The phrase “caveman” came from the assumption that our ancestors lived in caves like we live in houses. Caves were actually not that common. Lascaux  Altamira, Le Marche caves, and other caves were highly localized, not found in enough areas to provide homes. They were sites chosen to create images instructing when and where certain animals could be hunted, and what to use them for. Almanacs on the cave walls for public use. Let’s talk about making the cave art. Does anyone wonder how they painted such perfect, huge (as long as 20 feet), vivid animals deep in the darkest recess of the cave, sometimes 12 or even 20 feet off the ground on cave walls and ceilings? It would not be possible unless they had scaffoldings and light. I have been drawing and painting since two years of age. Not only can I not comprehend how they could be so accurate with their depictions, and they were, but how they created colors which have lasted thousands of years. Some of these locations were used for four or five thousand years by generations of artists and villages. Even Da Vinci didn’t make work that will last that long. 

People looking at the replica of Lascaux Cave paintings, France

Besides, caves are not good houses. You can’t heat them. During the winters of the Ice Age the wind roared and temperatures dropped below zero by fifty or more degrees. A fire was small protection against the iron fist of the cold. If you could seal off the entrance to your cave you might keep the wind out, but you would fall victim to the poison of the fire. Monoxide poisoning. If you ventilate your cave so you can breathe, you freeze to death in less than an hour. The truth is they built triple walled houses covered with waterproofed skins. Air is a good insulator, and they used other layers of stuff as well. The fireplace was vented with a flap that opened and closed at the top of your house, and was vented from underneath by a channel that brought air in from outside under the ground, so that your fire always had fresh air to burn, not the air in your house. This art of venting fireplaces was forgotten by modern designers. Indians knew how. 

The walls were painted white to reflect as much light as possible from tiny oil lamps. It would be all they had for months. Stones heated on a great fire outside were brought in and placed around like radiators. Smaller cloth-wrapped heated stones were put in the beds, just like in pioneering days here. Keeps the toes warm. When a baby was expected, warming stones were placed around the mother and the crib.

Paleolithic house diagram, 12,500 BC

Ever heard the term “smoke and mirrors?” Let me introduce you to its origin, and at the same time address the myth of the monstrous mammoths. 

Mammoth hunting was a source of provision for Ice Age humanity. Not just meat, but bone, fur, skins, and hair. Even the enormous rib cages were used, covered with skins, to provide shelter. But Mammoths are pack animals, like elephants. They travel in bunches, migrating to and from seasonal locations. According to historian-translator Duncan-Enzmann, villages dotted the landscape in 12,500 BC, and all the people participated in the hunt. They watched the skies and kept records to predict when the great herds would come through. Then when the stars were right, the watchers were sent out to the surrounding areas to wait for some sign of the mammoths. 

When the great heard was spotted smoke signals were sent by day, and light from a fire was reflected off of polished obsidian (smoke and mirrors) at night to warn the villages to be ready. Everyone participated. For weeks food was gathered to feed the hunters. Spears and throwers were made. (throwers are like a slingshot for spears, without them a spear would never penetrate the thick hide of a mammoth) Children beat the bushes with sticks and shouted. Women coordinated all the goings on, and the hunters were made ready. They could hear the herd thundering over the plains. Feel the ground shake. It was awesomely terrifying. Already the old textbook myth of the mammoth hunt doesn't work.

Inscriptions instructing how, where, and when to hunt, and how to process mammoths

Gotta love the Flintstones. They had all the commodities of modern life, in Stone Age fun.  Truth is, so did Ice Age humans. They needed to eat, stay warm, have babies, and protect themselves. Diapers, laundry, light, heat, and medicine, all were necessary then just like now. They did not, contrary to popular myth, wear just skins and sandals. Skins were used on the houses. They made yarn, and wove material and stuffed it to make quilting, using the abundance of Eider Duck down there was. From the quilts they made clothing. If you ski, you know Eider Down is the warmest natural substance known. Space blankets don’t count. They wore quilted clothing, layered boots, hats, mittens, all waterproofed. If they had not, we would not be here. The kind of protection needed to go out for even five minutes in Ice Age winters could not be created any other way. 

Lady at loom with lamp and three lumps of fuel, symbol for quilt, instructions to make shoes and boots, four females with papoose going out in quilted clothing to get supplies

At last, let me address the brutish grunting jerk dragging the women by her hair. First, the Neanderthal was the one who grunted. Homo-Sapiens-Sapiens had verbal language. And written language, as Duncan-Enzmann has proven. They did understand that without babies human life would end. This caused them to hold women and daughters in the highest esteem. Provide for them. Protect them. Women and children first is an ethic that comes from the Magdalenian culture of 12,500 BC. 


Reproductive calendric, Birth of baby girl Lorelei at winter solstice, 12,500 BC

In 12,500 BC babies born at winter solstice (around today’s Christmas) had the best chance of survival. Check out the article below and see why. To have babies then, they needed to be pregnant by spring equinox (today’s Easter). The calendar above instructs as to the timing of conception. Lorelei’s birth is an inscription about how to help the new baby be born. All of nature celebrated the birth of a daughter. They knew that like the golden sun, their golden haired daughters were required to provide life. Most Vanir had blonde curly hair, very fair skin. Referred to as the Fair Folk, they populate fairy tales as Fairies. The northern (Celtic) Aesir were strawberry blondes with pale skin. They both descended from dark haired, white skinned Picts, referred to in fairy tales as Pixies, like Snow White. 

Vanir, Aesir, and Pictish girls represented as Disney's princesses

Now my understanding of prehistoric humans has changed. They were smart, resourceful, brave, and caring. Family was important. They had aspirin (taken from willow twigs at just the right time) and digitalis (from Foxglove, for tired hearts) and many more medicines. The Rx symbol we still use today traces back to inscriptions from this time for the medicine lady and her medicines. Perhaps there is hope for us yet.


Inscription from 12,500 BC, Gönnersdorf, Germany. Medicine lady, patients, and medicines - origin of Rx used today 

Intrigued? Robert Duncan-Enzmann and J Robert Snyder have just published a compilation of translations from this period; the stories are drama at its best. Ice Age Language: Translations, Grammar, Vocabulary, available at Amazon



About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

     Symbology:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols 
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

 

 Fiction: 
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn


 




A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid










The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book






Monday, March 9, 2015

The Single Eye of the Cyclopes

Polyphemus, M. Snyder

The legendary Cyclopes (plural of “Cyclops”) were a race of giants who gained the reputation as dangerous, huge, raging beasts.  According to myth and legend they created Poseidon’s trident, Artemis’s bow, Zeus’s lightning, and other hero weapons and tools. They were said to have brute size and strength, and are credited with massive masonry such as megalithic observatories and the walls of Mycenea. 

Despite their notorious size, the single eye of the Cyclopes is their most defining characteristic. Their connection with the megaliths gives us a clue as to the reason for this unusual image. Huge stone observatories were built across continents to measure the movement of the heavens, and by doing so, support agriculture and navigation. The Cyclopes association with these Stone Age megalithic observatories makes it reasonable to conclude that these mythical giants were skilled in astronomy, and the geometry which developed from it. Both were necessary to design and build the megaliths. Such expertise requires development of tools, and as such we can connect Cyclopes to the use of lenses, which dates back to circa 4200 BC. Lenses were not uncommon in antiquity; an excavation in ancient Troy uncovered many optical lenses. In the British Museum there is a collection of lenses, one of which resembles a hand mirror. These artifacts give rise to speculation that many “sun disc” symbols depicted with gods and goddesses could actually represent reflective lenses.  
Cybele, M. Snyder
When looked at in context it is likely that the discs Cybele and Argus hold are c 700 BC reflecting telescope lenses.
One interesting question to ask is “why one eye?” Imagine yourself looking through a telescope or spyglass. You must first close one eye to use these tools, leaving one eye open. It is also true that some ancient observers’ and surveyors’ tools could injure the open eye, leaving you with only one functioning. Prehistoric astronomers used huge single standing-stones to measure the movement of stars and by 4000 BC the Vanir used crossed-strings (resembling the cross-hairs in the scope of a gun or modern telescope), and in doing so they had to close one eye. Perhaps this is why, but we do note that using reflective lenses, like using binoculars, allows use of two eyes. 

There are other mythological beings described as having one eye. According to ancient Norse legend, Odin sacrificed an eye for enlightenment and he was given the runes; interestingly, ancient rune patterns are very similar to the constellations that were over his kingdom of Asgard at the time (located at the Sea of Azov). Perhaps one-eyed images of Odin symbolize that he was given the gift of knowledge of the stars and had mastered astronomy; it is unlikely that he actually gave up an eye. The pool of water beneath the tree (Yggddrasil) could represent the trenches that were dug around megalithic sites and filled with water to provide a level horizon, and to reflect the stars (similar to moats). 

In decoding the meaning of the Cyclopes eye, we should also consider other one-eye symbols. Images depicting one eye are sometimes surrounded by radiating rays as found on the $1 bill, and are often accompanied by symbols of planets and stars, creating the association of  one-eye symbols to astronomy. This image is of a Masonic headstone. 

Duncan-Enzmann’s translation of a Masonic headstone in Castleton Churchyard, Derbyshire. The five-pointed star is a navigational Venus table for longitude from 4000 BC. The twelve-curved radiant depicts annual prevailing winds and tides, which were known and recorded 5000 BC. The six-pointed star represents the solar azimuth angles over a year, observed and noted from 14,000 BC. The single eye with twelve radiants in this image depicts three or four sailing seasons as a function of winds and currents, known at least by 4000 BC. The single eye symbol is repeatedly found in context with other astronomical images. Photographer unknown.
Cyclops Polyphemus was a son of sea god Poseidon, and Greek myths tell us he was killed by Odysseus with a flaming stick driven through his eye. Pictures of the event as depicted on pottery could easily be of the huge Cyclopes and a telescope. The image below is from a Amphora and depicts the story of Polyphemus. He is surrounded by symbols of astronomy – radiants (planets, stars, sun), lozenges (latitudinal location), solar Vs (solstices), and swastikas (movement, either atmospheric or the solar). Lines and patterns depicted are likely calendrics, and there are circumpuncts on the handle, symbols for accurate measurement of the movement and location of stars. 
Eleusis Amphora, photo by Rich Pianka 2005
The Cyclopes were descendants of the Watchers and Giants of circa 14,000 BC. Duncan-Enzmann's research shows that these ancient cultures were adept at astronomy, able to use the stars to navigate; calculating longitude millennia ago. The Cyclopes would have inherited this knowledge through oral tradition and symbolism just as it had been passed on for generations before them. 

Some legends surrounding these huge one-eyed creatures make them out to be raging primal beasts, as does the 1981 movie “The Clash of the Titans,” but this idea conflicts with the masonry and tools credited to their craftsmanship. Megalithic stones were hewn to perfection and aligned according to the movement of the stars and planets. Zeus’s lightening and Poseidon’s trident were powerful weapons, and cleverly crafted. Could the precision of these constructs have been accomplished by raging, out of control beasts? More likely, the Cyclopes’ large, powerful image represents their position in society, just as the images of Egyptian Pharaohs and gods were created larger than the regular people depicted in their hieroglyphic records. Greeks sculpted enormous statues of their gods and heroes, and sometimes they did not even closely resemble the actual person. Even today we perceive our experts as being larger-than-life and use symbols to designate specialties in skill and profession.   

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

     Symbology series:

Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols 
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

 

  
Fairy Tales: 
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn


 




A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid










The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book






Friday, March 6, 2015

The Valkyrie Code

Valkyrie
M Snyder

Le Tene (Switzerland) Sword 
of the 
Valkyrie Golden Viper Cult
ca. 400 BC


Vipers run from the hilt to the point and return

They remind you that:
"Death flows from hand to victim, 
then its bitterness flows back as a realization"


Prehistoric survival required knowledge of approximate astronomy, largely based on knowledge of the location of north; at one time true north was not the North Star, but Cygnus, the swan constellation in the Milky Way. This constellation is at the root of many bird mythologies. The importance of this knowledge was preserved in symbol and in tradition – feathered cloaks, bird goddesses, and fairies wings are a few symbolic remnants. 

During the Paleolithic Era, 12,500 BC, mythologies and oral tradition began to symbolize the human condition. Stories about storks bringing babies, swans nurturing and comforting babies, and taking their young souls to heaven if they died, represented the importance of these animals in the life sustaining cycles of the time. These stories connected birds with true North – Cygnus the Swan. By 9000 BC, during the Allerød, “mother” swans appear, anthropomorphic creatures created to symbolize the nurturing and protecting of little ones by nature and mothers. During the Boreal, 7000 BC, the mother-swans became human mothers with beautiful wings; these zoomorphic creatures became goddess-like in their cultural role. By 5000 BC, swan-mothers also comforted, protected, and escorted the souls of dead, brave young men to heaven. 

By 450 AD these swan-ladies became Valkyries, beautiful war-like loyal women at the battlefield, fighting alongside the men, taking the souls of dead soldiers to heaven. Valkyries are associated with the bright rays of the sun - the Fire of the Valkyries. Golden-haired women, with dazzling white arms and armor; they accompanied the brave fighters on the battlefield, riding swift horses or wolves during conflicts and wars. During more peaceful times, Valkyries became family-oriented beings who married, had babies, and nurtured the good.  

These golden haired ladies of the battle became legendary warriors, with swords and spears, and could decide the course of a battle, escorting heroes to Valhalla over Bitfrost (the rainbow). The heroes received mead (ambrosia) and were dressed in shining robes which are associated with clouds. Over time Valkyries became the ones to decide who was slain. Nymphs from Wotan’s (Odin’s) palace, messengers of the gods, and war-leaders, these beautiful women incited heroes to battle by their love and bravery, guided the soldiers, and tended to the wounded and the souls of the dead. They became known as Odin’s Warriors of Asgard (now lake Azov, north of the Black Sea).  

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:


     Non-fiction:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols 
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

 






 Fiction: 
NEW!!! The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons, first book

 












A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn


 








A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid