Sunday, June 21, 2015

Happy Fathers Day

Mother and child is a powerful archetype. Since the first birth, through millennia of human existence mothers and children were seen, and hailed as the continuation of the species. This image is found in every culture and every religion, and all around the world it is universally understood. It stands for the strongest love known and for the miracle of new life.   

But what of the dad?

Dads are the child’s first hero. He is there, providing and protecting both the mother and the child. Sweet little princesses hold their big hero-dad’s finger, and learn from him how it is she should be treated by future princes in her life. When a tiny prince is born, he learns from his dad how to be loyal and brave, work hard, dream of better things, and achieve them. He watches how his hero-dad treats the precious mom. And make no mistake; she is all important to the young prince. He is watching.

Like Father Like Son is a popular phrase. Perhaps it is used by those who want to place responsibility for a son’s actions onto the father. There is perhaps some truth to this, although it is not always accurate, and not always fair. But, genetically speaking it can be so. The young prince has inherited the looks, traits, likes, and dislikes of the parents. He learns habits and world view from those who raise him. 

Being a dad is a huge responsibility. It is a lifetime commitment. Your lifetime. Till you die, you will be a father, grandfather, and perhaps great grandfather. Children grow to adults, and still you are their father. Some men choose not to become fathers. Some become fathers without choosing. 

Having children is how humanity continues. Like every other species of plant or animal, fish or reptile, humans must procreate. It is part of being human. Some may choose not to, and that is ok. But to those who make the leap into fatherhood, I hail the tremendous courage it takes to be responsible for the life of a teeny tiny human. A lifetime of caring, providing, helping, teaching, training, housing, feeding, and loving is ahead of you. But there is no greater accomplishment. And just to be clear, some fathers sacrifice their lives to protect their own. The ultimate act of love is to protect at the cost of your own life. 

So, to all those fathers out there, be blessed, be proud of yourselves, and as I heard someone say, don’t weaken. You will reap rewards unavailable to those who do not know what fatherhood is.

All you fathers deserve a day off to be home instead of at work, to listen to the kids fight instead of to your co-workers bitch, and to experience the family you provide for. And remember on this day for dads, you would not be here without one. If your hero-dad still lives, be sure to thank him for taking the leap into fatherhood. The rest of us should remember that although the woman conceives and carries, gives birth through labor, and is generally responsible for diapers and food, without a man there would be no new life. Thank him for his hard work out in the tough world to make a living, to pay rent or mortgage, and standing up for his family when necessary. 

Happy Fathers Day!!!


About Symbologist Michelle Snyder


Michelle earned her post-graduate degree at the University of Wales, decoding prehistoric images, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales and tracing them to their roots. She is an author, columnist, publisher, artist, and teacher. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
     Books by Michelle, available at Amazon:

    Symbology series:


Symbology ReVision: Unlocking Secret Knowledge  
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: My Art and Symbols 
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered 
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images 
Symbology: World of Symbols  
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Fairy Tales: 

A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book One - The Lost Unicorn
A Tale of Three Kingdoms: Book Two - The Lost Mermaid
The Fairy Tales: Once-Upon-A-Time Lessons First Book



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