Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Greenland Ice Core Timeline

Excerpt from Symbology: Decoding Symbols through History
A Thesis at the University of Wales
By Michelle Snyder, Symbologist

Camp Century, Greenland

The Camp Century Ice Core Timeline

By Dr. Robert Duncan-Enzmann


  BC
45,000               Hengelo Denecamp
29,000               Aurignacian
21,000                Solutrean
14,500                Lascaux
12,500                Bølling
  9000                 Allerød
  8000                 Pre Boreal
  6000                 Boreal 
  5900–3750   Atlantic Grand Climate Optimum

(Note: The Atlantic Grand Climate Optimum was a time of magnificent climate, warmer than our current centuries. Humankind made great strides in this environment.) 

3:9 Atlantic (5900 – 3750 BC) Grand Climate Optimum
The greatest strides in life and learning can be achieved when the weather is warm and life is easier, and beginning with the Atlantic Era, mankind flourished as never before. During the glorious warm Atlantic centuries agriculture boomed over vast areas. Numerous cardinals and symbols were inscribed to record knowledge of medicine, childcare, and the how-to’s necessary for survival. They were inscribed on hide, ivory, bone, and stone - and on the great megaliths. We now know the fascinating megalithic constructions (giant stone observatories) carry history of preceding millennia preserved with symbols, as well as within the very construction of these fascinating structures. These great stone circles give us a glimpse of the intelligence and industry of our ancestors; they are monuments to their genius. Heralded by sighting rods at proto-Stonehenge of circa 8200 BC, megalithic observatories sing to us of a glorious past. They sing, not simply of men and boys quarrying, then dragging, colossal stones hundreds of miles (usually during winters), siting them in and setting them in, but also of women, little girls, and boys for whom these mind-wrenching, body-crushing labors of love are undertaken; yes, labors of love to better all lives.

Like the great hunts, building the megaliths was an effort in which everyone took part. Even in tiny villages, people greeted the teams. Families helped a little and each night fed, told stories to, and provided comfortable beds (warmed with heating stones) for boys and men of the labor gangs that struggled to drag and slide the precious stones over icy terrain (without ice, this trek would not have been possible). Why such an enormous effort? Because life was precious, girls and women were highly esteemed. Like our electric, water, and road utilities, the great stone circles were built to facilitate the functions of life. Generations of collected seasonal, agricultural, and sometimes navigational information were engraved onto the stones, arranged according to astronomical calculations, sort of like a farmer’s almanac(1). These megalith observatories whisper of earlier millennia through which grannies, mothers, and daughters did more than simply nurture little ones. Minute by minute they battled to keep children alive and healthy. Even one minute of carelessness in the bitter iron cold of a glacial maximum, where  carnivores broke their teeth trying to eat frozen animals they killed perhaps only an hour ago, could result in a child freezing their fingers, searing their lungs, or otherwise being so harmed they were crippled for life. Those beginnings are still told by megalith observatories, symbols, signs, and - yes - writings scratched on ivory, leather, bone, and stone plaques, seemingly mostly by the ladies.



       Neolithic Dolmen, New Zealand                         Goseck, Germany                                      Stonehenge, England  
           ca. 8000 BC                                                              ca. 4200 BC                                                 ca. 3200 BC

These great utilities were vital to the survival of the family, clan, and village. Stone observatories were built all over the great European continent, a vast utility to spread knowledge and facilitate life. The Indo-European language spread with the construction of this utility; accuracy of construction demanded it(2). Universal spoken and written language is a consequence of utilities of continental extent. Today we see the English language spread by global utilities such as Marine Rules of the Road and Air Traffic Control.     


Andronova Corridor

During the millennia of the Atlantic era, the practices of herding and raising poultry (geese and ducks) increased. Chickens from India, via Persia, reached Greece circa 6000 BC. Bountiful stores of grain were protected from rodents with cats, serpents, and barn owls. “Gifts” of milk and honey were left out for these honored creatures in hopes that they would stay, increase, and protect the precious food stores. Later these gifts became offerings to the gods(3). Meanwhile, following food and crops, the herding, cattle-rustling northern Celtic culture traveled the Andronova Corridor and migrated into Europe, eventually merging with the goddesses agricultural way of life; a “War of Accommodation” (a mostly peaceful effort - not war as we think of it today) followed as the two lifestyles learned to live and thrive together. Symbols like the Green Man(4), along with numerous others, have their roots in these merging cultures: The Green Man is a farmer. Heretofore farming had been a predominantly feminine activity(5) - the Green Man combines “Mother Nature” with male features - symbolizing the steppe warrior becoming a plowboy-occasional warrior: a male farmer. This important symbol is covered further in section 5:8.

From the dotted calendrics of Hengelo Denekamp (45,000 BC) to the tetra fauna animals of Chauvet Caves during the Aurignacian period (29,000 BC), the symbols mankind developed were predominantly records of heavenly events that affected their lives. By 21,000 BC, during the Solutrean warm interval, symbols for childcare, housing, and textiles are clearly in use. Here is the origin of the Star of David, as a notation for winter solstice sunrise and sunset. Human reproduction calendrics from the Paleolithic (12,500 BC), instruct that babies should be conceived in spring, to be born around winter solstice. The Allerød (9000 BC) Yggdrasil is the ancestor of the Tree of Life.

Writing of the Vinca culture included phonetics during the Boreal (6000 BC). From 5,900 BC to 3700 BC, during the Atlantic Grand Climate Optimum, the Indo-European language spread with the construction of a continental utility of stone observatories, just as the English language is now spread through global utilities such as Air Traffic Control. The symbols used to record the gambit of human development are a source of wisdom, knowledge, and history. Symbols are an abbreviated form of communication used by our ancestors to explain procedures for various activities and their timing, as in weaving and planting. The images convey functional value as in the depiction of hunting rituals.

The study of symbols enhances understanding of past civilizations, their resourcefulness, survival skills, and their contributions. Understanding that our ancestors were intelligent and resourceful can change the way we perceive humanity today. These records help us compile important information about the earth’s climate and geological history. Accurate information about our prehistoric past, both the history of human activity and natural phenomenon, helps the decisions we make in our present and our future.



(1) Also see Kennedy, Maev. Lasers Reveal Stonehenge's 'art gallery' at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2003/oct/18/arts.artsnews
(2) This logical conclusion is contained in detailed information compiled by Knight and Lomas. (2001). Uriel's Machine. Canada: Fair Winds. 
(3) Gifts became offerings, and much later, offerings were twisted into sacrificial offerings of both animals and humans. 
(4) The name "Green Man" was not used until the 1900s; Jack-O-the-Green, Pan, Robin Goodfellow, Puck, and other names were used. 
(5) We note that Shoe Last Plows were used in 9000 BC in feminine kitchen gardens of Freesia, Flanders, and Germany, and that ca 8500 BC along the Danube, men plowed behind draft animals. A plow too big for kitchen gardens was found near the Iron Gate and is dated to 8000 BC.  

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder



About Symbologist Michelle Snyder
Michelle did her post-graduate research at the University of Wales decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, and mythology, folklore, and fairy tales. She is an author, publisher, speaker, artist, and teacher who has been teaching art and visual language skills for 40 years. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio. 
Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Decoding Symbols through History
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon

Friday, December 30, 2016

Sirius Rising - Happy New Year!






A new year. 

We have orbited the sun again, and now it is time to change the numbers; 2016 becomes 2017. The past year is memorialized in blogs and posts and newscasts, portraying images and stories considered important during the past 365 days. 

Perhaps you have always practiced a turning-of-the-year tradition, perhaps you are new to New Year celebrations at midnight on January 1st. In some cultures like Egypt the new year starts at harvest time. Why does our year change when it does? It all has to do with Sirius, a very bright star that has guided navigators for millennia; in fact it is the brightest star in the sky. It is actually a binary (double) star which has been observed since antiquity. 

Ptolemy of Alexandria used Sirius as the location for the globe’s central meridian when he mapped the stars. Sirius is called the Dog Star, due to its position in the Canis Major (Greater Dog) constellation; many cultures associate this star with dogs. Sirius marked the coming of winter for the Polynesians, for the Egyptians it foretold flooding of the Nile, in Greece it accompanied the hot, “dog days” of summer. Its name means sparkling, or scorching. In the children’s rhyme Hey Diddle Diddle Sirius makes an appearance: The little laughing dog is Sirius in Canis Major, marking the growing season which “laughs” bountiful; the dish and spoon are so full - it is more than we can eat. 

In ancient times Sirius was called the "Star of the Sea," and was depicted as an inverted pentagram. Some early American flags connected with the Navy displayed inverted stars, like the one flown by Commodore Perry in 1854. A rare contemporary usage of the inverted pentagram symbolizing Sirius  is the American Medal of Honor. 

Eight thousand years ago the Vanir astronomers worked out the geometry and trigonometry necessary to accurately measure the distance and movement of the stars and planets (Enzmann). They devised the calendar, named the days of the week, and discovered the accuracy of the Venus clock – with which we set the world’s clocks until the 1970’s. They also observed the cycle of Sirius, and began the year with its pinnacle. The symbol for the Venus clock - the pentagram - is sometimes used for Sirius. Knowing the time is one thing, knowing when to reset the clock is another.  

Once a year, when Sirius is opposite the sun, it rises when the sun sets. This marks a new beginning: A new year rings in at midnight, the moment it reaches its highest point in the sky on the celestial meridian. To us it is the New Year Star, a blazing reminder that our orbit starts again. 

At this new beginning humans like to make a new start. New Year’s resolutions abound, good intentions are had by all. We promise ourselves we will avoid the seven deadly sins, be nice to our in-laws, go to the gym three times a week, and give up that one sweet treat we always regret eating. Sometimes we keep our promises, sometimes not; but each year Sirius gives us another chance. Another new beginning. 

As long as we live the Earth will turn, the Sun will rise, and Sirius will start a new year. This year, promise to do something that will last, something that will create precious memories, new traditions, or a family legacy. That way, when we are gone and the Sun still rises, something of ourselves will continue; an immortality of sorts. 


And have a Happy New Year!! 



About Symbologist Michelle Snyder



About Symbologist Michelle Snyder
Michelle did her post-graduate research at the University of Wales decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, and mythology, folklore, and fairy tales. She is an author, publisher, speaker, artist, and teacher who has been teaching art and visual language skills for 40 years. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio. 
Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Spirit of Giving

My Bow, Michelle

It gets us all. Eventually. No matter what your tradition, or lack of, is, the Spirit of Giving is in the air in November and December. Perhaps this is a powerful genetic inheritance from the Ice Age when our ancestors had to make sure everyone survived the deepest, coldest, sub-zero winters you could imagine. Five minutes outside and you would be ice through and through. Wind chill took it to fifty below. So checking on your neighbors, giving to those who had needs, and general caring, were a matter of survival. So even in 12,500 BC people were giving.

The return of the sun follows the shortest days of the year. The sun travels to its lowest point on the Analemma and hangs out there for three days before starting the climb back up toward the equator, warming the frozen earth. Winter Solstice is the turning point. Our ancestors knew that. They huddled in their houses - yes houses, not caves - with warming stones heated on great fires that never went out, fires in the fireplace, oil lamps lighting their homes (Duncan-Enzmann). They were spinning, weaving and quilting, telling stories about themselves to their children (thus "spinning a yarn") to preserve their history and knowledge.

Soon after the Winter Solstice the days get longer, the ice melts, and life has survived. No wonder we celebrate. Wouldn't you? After thousands of years of social behavior a genetic memory is formed. At least, that is what I have read. So, it is in our genes to give.


The beautiful Celtic cross is a symbol of Winter Solstice, the cross symbolizing the four directions with the southern arm lengthened to designate how to see the symbol (like a North symbol on a map). The orbit of the Earth is represented by the circle (an ellipse would be more accurate), intersecting the cross at the bottom, symbolizing the sun's lowest position on our horizon at the Tropic of Capricorn, which happens at Winter Solstice. The knotted lines are part of the calendric and tell us that, in this case, it is a Winter Solstice symbol. The other intersections are the two equinoxes, and at the top, Summer Solstice. 

What a wonderful symbol to use for the resurrection of life through the eternal rising of the sun, or Son. Winter Solstice is the time when the light returns, lengthening the days and warming the cold earth, returning life to vegetation and spirit. The Festival of Lights celebrates this never ending cycle. 

Have a wonderful holiday season! And whether you are Christian, Jewish, Pagan, or any other tradition, I wish you joy and blessings. They will come to you when you care, and give.


About Symbologist Michelle Snyder
Michelle did her post-graduate research decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, and mythology, folklore, and fairy tales, at the University of Wales. She is an author, publisher, speaker, artist, and teacher who has been teaching art and visual language skills for 40 years. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio. 
Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon


Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Ancient Roots of Tarot Images


The Hermit
Michelle Snyder
The symbol system of the Tarot can elicit curiosity, wonder, fear, intrigue, and superstition, among other responses. Attitudes about these images range from reverence to hatred. Sometimes referred to as the Devil’s Picture-book, common opinions are that the images carry esoteric knowledge, forbidden or suppressed information, or hidden history. Other names for the Tarot were the Bible of the Gypsies, the Encyclopedia of the Dead, and the Perpetual Almanac, names that imply information. The belief that there is a connection between the Tarot and witchcraft has lingered.
Page of Cups
Michelle Snyder
Attitudes like these have followed the Tarot through the centuries. The first reference to the trumps of the Tarot was in a sermon by a Franciscan Friar in the 1400’s, who contended that the trumps were invented and named by the Devil. Cards in general are considered a vice. In The Devil’s Picturebook, Paul Huson writes, “In medieval Europe everyone knew that cards, apart from simple gambling, were used for telling fortunes, a dangerous activity. Worse still, lurking within the cards are devils disguised as kings and heroes.” Some hold to this attitude even today. The Tarot seems to hold a special place among those who deem cards sinful. Fish are symbols of wisdom; the Page of Cups sits ready to learn the wisdom of the ages

Alluring and colorful, the images on Tarot cards have been carefully crafted. What is written about their history varies, and there is little consensus about their origin. The mystery surrounding Tarot cards adds to the belief by some that they are evil, magic, and dangerous. For others, this veil of obscurity is a result of secret powerful knowledge which can be accessed only by initiates. The images of the Tarot are said to contain surviving lore of the Order of the Knights Templar. Troubadours of the Middle Ages carried Tarot cards and used them as part of their entertainment, to preserve and pass on “heretical” philosophies of the Grail. Many believe the pictures on these cards contain information and secrets protected from the Roman Catholic Church, preserved in a series of symbolic images.

This prompts another query. Perhaps the history of the cards is absent because it was suppressed or destroyed? This would be in line with the fate of much knowledge in our recent past.  

The mysterious history of the Tarot is connected with The Book of Thoth, ca. 3000 BC, a book credited to Hermes Trismegistus. Hermes is another name for Thoth, the Egyptian god of wisdom, learning, and literature. 

Duncan-Enzmann contends that this esoteric tome was developed from knowledge recorded by the megalith navigators working at Lixus, Nabata (Sudan), and Byblos around 4200 BC – knowledge that dates back at least 8000 years during warm Atlantic centuries. The Merovingian Vanir women recorded their astronomical observations, as well as the math and geometry needed to calculate longitude, on stone, bone, and ivory. This knowledge was passed on through oral tradition and symbols.


Rider Waite Tarot
Many of these long-ago images have survived suppression as well as natural deterioration. Sadly, the underground stream of oral tradition was shattered along with the burning of libraries like Alexandria, when teachers, scholars, and authors of scrolls were murdered. We must reconstruct the key to these images in order to piece together the history of the Tarot. To do this we will study the symbols, comparing them to others used throughout history. Comparative symbology is an effective way to decode images and discover their origin. 

One comparison is of the card Strength. Imaged correctly as a female and a lion, this card carries the same information as the Sphinx: that of the Great Year at equinox. Many images on the Tarot cards are of the sun, moon, and stars. Many more also have astronomical significance but are not as readily recognizable. The sun is the oldest image known. The blonde child on this card represents the Sun Child of the Vanir from ca. 12,500 BC, later known as the goddess Helen. The Moon card depicts two pillars, a symbol which dates back tens of thousands of years to the tools used for measuring movement of planets, sun, moon, and stars. The star in the Star card is eight-pointed, a symbol of the Venus clock indicating her eight-year cycle. The seven smaller stars represent the days of the week, a division of time.

Rider Waite Tarot
Another symbol that is part of many cards is the “infinity” symbol, which derives from and represents the analemma, a symbol relating to the position of the sun and the equation of time, which appears above the female’s head on Strength, above the magician’s head on The Magician, and on other cards. The Magician wears an ouroborus belt, symbolizing eternal cycling of substance and inanimate matter. The Rider-Waite Two of Pentacles (shown) decodes as a solar, lunar, and stellar year. The pentacle represents time, the Venus clock of the Vanir navigators by which we set our modern clocks until the 1970s.
Tarot cards connect strongly with astrology and astronomy, which encompass a wealth of information both as exact science and art. Transmitting mathematical precision and interesting descriptions of the fascinating events in the sky demands accurate recording. How was this done, then, before written records? Even with them we have a hard time maintaining accuracy and consistency.

Let us consider how astronomy was taught once upon a time, long, long before written language. In these long-ago classrooms, 14,500 years ago, most teachers were women and most students were girls. Lessons were likely recited, perhaps as rhymes chanted and sung.

Imagine how these songs would be elaborated upon as they were repeated over the centuries. Visual aids were used: pictures and symbols, dots and lines, signs and patterns. All on stone, bone, ivory, ceramics, and bast; small and easily handled, like flash cards or playing cards. For thousands of years these lessons were taught by oral tradition, handed down using stories, songs, and pictures. The grand stories of the zodiac were repeated, pictures created, and astronomy developed.

The ancient mariners of the Atlantic had skilled female navigators. They were masters of astronomy, wind, and current. Knowing time to the second is necessary on the high seas – the Ace of Pentacles symbolizes the ability to do this using the Venus clock. The association of wealth to pentacles is logical, considering that being able to calculate longitude - time and location - with Venus allowed trade and defense at sea, both necessary for successful commerce and defense. Hermes’ Emerald Tablet is known for the phrase “as above, so below.” Many interpretations are in the spiritual and metaphysical realm; perhaps here I can offer a more pragmatic translation: If you know the stars above, you will know exactly where you are on Earth below.

Over thousands of years megalithic observatories were constructed; a great continental utility built to support care for women and children, facilitating agriculture and navigation. Today we have continental utilities like electric power plants. The construction of these observatories required that measurement be standardized and transmitted over great distances with accuracy, and a method of teaching how to measure the heavens and divide circles was needed. We can see some of these lessons in the symbolism of the Tarot.

Rider Waite Tarot
The suit of wands or scepters represents obelisks, menhirs, and ashera rods, tools used to site and measure the movement of the stars to divide time, and to survey the ground for construction of an observatory. The Three of Wands represents the triple tau. Tau is a symbol indicating perfect horizontal and vertical necessary to measure a star’s height from the horizon: the T of the Tau is made of a horizontal line and a vertical line. The Five of Wands depicts dividing an angle by five, a function of the Venusion clock.

Solar Vee Winter Solstice, Blombos, S. Africa, ca. 77,000 BC
Duncan-Enzmann translation; Rider-Waite Tarot
One card with ancient roots is the Two of Swords, a symbol for the solar azimuth Vee – an image found in Blombos, South Africa from 77,000 BC, representing sunrise and sunset of winter solstice.

Passing knowledge on to future generations has been a human challenge and activity for millennia. Tens of thousands of years ago our ancestors watched the sky and observed the repeating patterns of the stars and the movements of the planets. Star-patterns were connected to events on earth and recorded, allowing the development of seasonal agricultural calendrics which greatly improved the quality of life.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle did her post-graduate research decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, and mythology, folklore, and fairy tales, at the University of Wales. She is an author, publisher, speaker, artist, and teacher who has been teaching art and visual language skills for 40 years. Her artwork, inspired by her love of symbolism and folklore, has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.
Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: My Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid

 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon