Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Once Upon a Time to be - the Eternal Sun Child




Could it be? Eternal youth is powerfully attractive. Searches for a “fountain of youth” are legendary and continue today. It’s a grail of sorts, endlessly speculated on, and relentlessly worked on in the laboratory: the quest for longer, healthier life. The scientific quest isn’t to just work generally toward a way for all people reach a biological maximum, it’s to expand this. In the last decades there has been more than a little success. Currently, much talk is of: telomeres, stem cells, organ replacement, etc. The point is we are all dying, we just want to die as slowly as possible. 

There are many stories and legends about eternal life or eternal youth. One story of an eternal adult life is The Wandering Jew, by Eugene Sue; it is compelling, sad – even heartbreaking - but also heartwarming. The Eternal Child is a legend found in all lands, with roots reaching deep into-and-beyond the daughters of prehistoric ice ages. Various myths and fairy tales tell of one such child: Circassian Helen. These stories were shared by unknowns who are lost deep in the mists of long-ago time. It is a story with child-appeal - and the appeal of eternal childhood. It conveys inspiration, along with uninterpretable cautions and warnings. It’s the most plausible of the “long-life myths.” Helen-of-many-names dates from circa 42,000 BC; she is the ancestor of the ice age Sun Child, Sun Maiden, then Sun Goddess, Helen.  (Helen being the word for the golden mean, for perfect beauty)

This beautiful Sun Child’s story, preserved through history by oral tradition, ice age inscriptions, and later, legends, mythologies, and folklore, begins in the battle for survival. Days of death come as the terrible winter of an ice age descends.  The “Fires of Aurignacia” must be learned: one learns all about starting fires, or dies. Humankind survived near ten thousand years of terrible, terrible cold, with only a few mild pauses. Through the deepest cold month, sitting together, women sang and worked in triple walled houses. Beside warming fires (ventilated, lest they die of monoxide) they sat spinning, weaving, and making tools, with only tiny oil lamps for light. As these determined women spun, they shared stories with young children, teaching them how to survive (the origin of 'spinning a yarn). Brave men, boys, and some girls ventured out to hunt. 

These ice age parents wanted their children to be born during the most favorable time of year – this was critical for survival.  It was also love, along with planning to their best abilities, for a much-wanted child. In France there is a magnificently revealing series of inscriptions where, written in stone, is recorded the tendency for families to start children at the Spring Equinox. According to Duncan-Enzmann, these are calendrics, timing birth and early infancy for maximum probability of survival. Babies born at the Winter Solstice had close and constant care from mothers, sisters, and helpers during the winter months when few ventured outside for very long. In warmer weather there were many natural predators, viruses, bugs, etc., and there was much to be done to prepare for the next winter, leaving less time for infants. All these factors made winter babies desirable.

We owe a magnificent tribute to our Ur-Mothers, daughters, aunties, grandmothers, and friends, who, together in deepest glacial winters, battled day and night to keep children alive and provide for them, working with only the light of tiny stone lamps. All together they did their best to keep precious Winter Solstice babies alive and healthy. It’s drama. The greatest of all dramas.

Then the cold months passed, together they were winning. The sun returned. The new child was near four moons old; her hair shone like golden sunlight. Day and night, week after week, one, then another of the women held her, fed her - and she lived. Little Sun Girl, born just as the Sun is reborn. All together, women and girls, men and boys, kept her alive. And next door a little boy has survived.

Love is powerful. Generation after generation: mother to daughter, precious sunny daughter to mother. Together they study the heavens – they must, the cycles of nature hold great power and their lives are in the balance. Oral tradition and picture writing preserved accumulated knowledge. These determined women inscribed their observations on bone, stone, leather, and ivory, on megaliths and cave walls. The beautiful blonde daughter became the symbol of the sun; both were and are necessary for survival. Millennia later, Sun Goddess Helen was symbolized by Venus; a clock so accurate that only toward the middle of the twentieth century was it replaced by quartz, atomic Cs, and perhaps soon, nuclear clocks. 

This history is woven into our very genetics. Mothers and fathers together created the Sun Child, who grew in mythology to be the Goddess Helen. Many religions promise eternal life to those who follow the right path. Mythologies of eternal childhood are scattered around the globe. The Sun Child’s ancestor, Circassian Helen, flits in and out of history, her young eternal life creating myths and legends that precede the Sun Child by many thousands of years.  

The ancient story of Circassian Helen is one of chance and accident, as are many legends of life changing events. Once Upon a Time, little girl Helen, playing as children do, nearly drowned when a river, during spring flood, reached over its banks and grabbed her, dragging her to the edge and finally dumping her into the torrent. There, a spheroidal tree root - Mississippian pilots call them river spiders – gripped, tore, and lacerated her. These roots, these things in the water, were between five to twenty feet in diameter, and sort of compare with tumbleweeds on land. With her are a few animals, also gripped by the tangled and hooked roots. And then, as if by miracle, the twirling river spider, bounding to the surface, hurls her away into a bramble thicket on the shore. There she lay until her mother found her; she was lacerated, cut, bruised – and inoculated by countless viruses. Mother nursed the child and she recovered; but she was forever changed. The viruses, which inject, or perhaps subtract, changed into a genome. As a result, Helen no longer ages.

We now know that only a small percentage of cells actually cease reproducing themselves and cause aging. There are syndromes such as progeria, also anagyria, which are rarely talked about.  There are also conditions in which life, including human life, never matures. In the animal world there are genetic syndromes in which an aged creature can regress to a juvenile state. There are creatures that regenerate lost limbs, and some cut in two will become two creatures, such as the cold water Hydra of North American waters. 

Mythical Circassian Helen, gifted with all of the above, heals lost members, regularly grows new teeth, never ages, and - somewhat frighteningly - has a brain continually improving. Yet, eternally a child, she perpetually directs herself toward playing. A child’s work is to play. Most alarming of all is the myth that a pint of her blood transfused will yield the recipient an extra century of life. Imagine the tales of greed, horror, murder, mayhem, and corruption this, if true, would generate. In these legends, Circassian Helen ably defends herself - she vastens (manipulates using quantum entanglement) and can stop a heart hundreds of feet away. Scraps of recorded legendary events follow her never-ending life. She appears in Chinese myths, and is referred to in others as the “Distant Watcher”. Imagine, how being forever a playing child would, in a way, also be lonesome. In folklore, passed on from generation to generation, she still wanders by herself with a dog cart in 1000 AD. In 2000 AD she is still, and forever, alone. 

I was once asked: “If the Hand of the Grail appeared, offering you eternal life – eternally to be the age you are – would you accept?” This offer lasts only seconds. No time to hesitate. Now I ask you, would you accept?

Image: Llewellyn Tarot, Ace of Cups



About Symbologist Michelle Snyder



Michelle Snyder is a professor of mythology, and an author, publisher, speaker, and artist. She  did her post-graduate research at the University of Wales, decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales.  Her artwork has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.

Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Decoding Symbols through History
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon






Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Love, Roses, and Cupid


Symbolism has provided a means of communicating ancient love rituals worldwide. Some familiar symbols for love are XXs, OOs, and hearts, which convey kisses, hugs, and love; these are often seen on a crumpled up private note, inside a card, or on a tree trunk. In Victorian times, the language of flowers was a popular way to communicate intimate messages. Different flowers and colors have specific meanings. Roses are a symbol of discrete or secret love, thus the phrase sub-rosa - under the rose.

Love is one of our strongest emotions, and perhaps the one most difficult to describe. We see it, feel it, even hear it, yet cannot sufficiently explain it in words. 

Songs, movies, plays, books, and great works of art have attempted to speak for our hearts. Love drives the hero knight to rescue the fair damsel, in spite of dangers to himself which usually include the possibility of death. Thousands of fairy tales tell the stories of princesses rescued by Prince Charming knights and restored to their rightful place. These stories are symbols of a culture now rare, a culture whose men lived by the ethic of women and children first. Sleeping Beauty is such a story and is at least 10,000 years old. Until the deconstruction of Prince Charming in Shrek II, he was the standard of chivalry and courtly behavior, pure of heart and strong of love. Shown: Sleeping Beauty, Walter Crane
  


I found it amusing to that Cupid is the son of Venus, the goddess of love, and Mars, the god of war: thus a hopeless romantic, running around with a fistful of arrows. At first depicted as a young man, the son of the goddess of love became a chubby little baby over time (perhaps he found the fountain of youth?). This little cherub is now a famous symbol for falling in love. Cupid also symbolizes life, which is lived in the eternal present.


There is a mythological love story about Cupid and the beautiful Psyche, depicted by many masters of the fine art of painting and told of in the great art of storytelling. Cupid was commissioned by Venus, who was jealous of the beauty of Psyche, to compel Psyche to fall in love with an ugly mortal. Psyche is sleeping as Cupid approaches, but she wakes suddenly. Startled, he accidentally scratches his own leg with an arrow, thus inflicting his ‘arrow of love’ upon himself. He falls in love with her. They marry and have a child named Voluptas (Voluptas means pleasure, Cupid means Eros or desire, Psyche means soul).


The archer of love also shot his arrows into many of the characters of mythology, causing two persons to fall in love who may otherwise not have become a couple. Here he is depicted with a "sea monster," symbolizing his relationship with the great sea kings - the Vanir mariners of ca. 4000 BC. This is key, as it is the Vanir navigators who used Venus as a clock, measuring its movements in the sky; it is by Venus that ancient mariners calculated longitude, enabling them to sail the world's oceans and seas. Most of the navigators were women, and women had discovered the Venus clock. So it is that Venus became symbolized by a goddess, representing that women had used the heavenly body of Venus to establish accurate astronomical time. Now symbols of love, Venus and Cupid are the subject of artwork both classical and contemporary.
      

From the oral tradition of the Vanir grew many mythologies, the goddess of love being one of them. Her son, Cupid, is a classical symbol of unexpected passion and love, his arrows striking targets without discrimination, sometimes inflicting love on people who were not able to openly show their feelings for each other. A heart pierced by an arrow from his quiver is a symbol of romantic desire, broken hearts, or unrequited love. His arrows can inflict either attraction or repulsion – a symbolic representation of the movements of Venus and Mars as they orbit the sun.

I would be remiss if I did not mention Valentine's Day; a day when children in school who don't get valentines feel rejection, the single long for a mate, and the disenchanted remember their past love. It is the lucky ones who can take a moment to express their hearts to each other: Associated with Saint Valentine, the saint of courtly love, the medieval tradition of love between a knight and a married noblewoman. This tradition has been celebrated with pink roses, hearts, and chocolates since the Middle Ages. The saint is said to have wed lovers who were otherwise forbidden to marry. Chaucer associated February 14th with Saint Valentine's Day as a day of romantic love. 


Love is a complex reality. Powerful, motivating, uplifting, or painful and devastating, love cannot be ignored. There are those among us fortunate enough to meet their soul-mates; others go through eternity always knowing each other but never being together. This illustration (artist unknown) poignantly illustrates two soul mates who can look through the barrier, but not penetrate it.

  Love fuels compassion, hope, and charity, and heals the unseen wounds of the soul. 

Excerpt from Symbology, Hidden in Plain Sight: the secret life of symbols.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder



Michelle Snyder is a professor of mythology, and an author, publisher, speaker, and artist. She  did her post-graduate research at the University of Wales, decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales.  Her artwork has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio.

Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Decoding Symbols through History
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon





Saturday, February 4, 2017

Emerging Resonances of Numbers

Zoe Wallis and Michelle Snyder


The Pythagoreans were not the only ones who gave symbolic meaning to numbers. According to Vincent Hopper, "nothing in the history of number symbolism is so striking as the unanimity of all ages and climates in regard to the meanings of a few number symbols." He refers to this as elementary number symbolism. Pythagoras said, Number is the ruler of forms and ideas, and the cause of gods and daemons.”

Numeration is a natural process. We started with patterns of dots in prehistory. Gematria is a Kabbalistic method of interpreting the Hebrew scriptures by computing the numerical value of words, based on those of their constituent letters. With the evolution of humanity, symbols also evolve. These are emerging resonances associated with numbers, as determined by Zoe in her research.

 0         All potential, wholeness
1          Primacy: things of first importance including the self
2          Development
3          Gathering power
4          Enablement opening
5          Answering design
6          New life
7          Expansion of connections
8          Teaching
9          Collaboration
10        New reality
11        Mastery leading 7
12        Serving new reality 5
13        New beginnings 8
14        Presentation of truth
15        Vitalizing presentation of service 2
16        Leading renewing knowledge
17        Answering victory 9
18        Presentation of life
19        Renewal of quickening
20        Joining keys 7
21        Widening teaching 2
22        Values of service 2
23        Serving keys of continuity
24        Serving keys of mastery 8
25        Serving keys of development 4
26        Serving keys of zenithing 3
27        Truth presenting direction
28        Direction presenting validation 6
29        Humanity guiding continuity

100      Reality presenting widening 5
200      Undertaking connections 6
300      Serving opportunities 8
400      Presenting victory to yielding 8
500      Success teaching unity 4
600      New life victorious
700      Undertaking development of connections 9
800      Serving identity’s keys 9
900      Teaching change answering 9
1000    Reality presenting new life 6
1999    Ending dispensation
2000    Presenting humanity to God 8
2001    Radical change presenting new life
2002    Presenting God to humanity 7
2003    Presenting harmony to worlds 4
3004    Presenting restoration to worlds 4
2005    Presenting keeping delivery to humanity 4
2006    Presenting victory to humanity 6
2007    Presenting answering humanity to rescue 7
2008    Fostering wisdom 8
2009    Presenting new human reality to God 6
2010    God rescuing humanity 9
2011    Well-coming life 6
2012    Kindling answering timing 7
2013    God an d humanity changing our creation forever 4
2014    God and humanity opening Eden to all human beings 8
2015    Kindling future victory 8
2016    Bringing God home 9

0: Opening all potential – joining with all working for peace in our world

1: New reality realm of awakening goodness and zenithing orientation – vitalizing perspective of our personal identity key, Grounding

2: New reality realm of becoming work and experience teaching development – developing peace through our personal identity key, heart

3: New reality realm of vision perspective and kindship unification – achieving harmony of self through our personal identity key, mind

4: New reality realm of zenithing kindness and caring wonder and learning opening the way – our true way is enabled by our personal identity key – learning

5: New reality realm of new understanding freedom and responsibility answering design – our Eden becomes through our personal identity key – spirit

6: New reality realm of harmony of integrity answering and quality realizing new life – we answer quality through our personal identity key – relationship

7: New reality realm of change kindling and opening reciprocity – knowing yonder through our personal identity key – relationships

8: New reality realm of teaching zenithing and gains perspectives of teaching – zenithing gains through our personal identity key – example

9: New reality realm of answering epigenetic evolution joy and enlightenment satisfaction – fostering perfection through our personal identity key – work

10: New reality realm of peace love an jubilation realizing peace – bringing victory through our personal identity key – peace


11: Closing mastery leading – bringing correct transition


About Symbologist Michelle Snyder



About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle Snyder is a professor of mythology, and an author, publisher, speaker, and artist. She  did her post-graduate research at the University of Wales, decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales.  Her artwork has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio. 

Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Decoding Symbols through History
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon







Saturday, January 28, 2017

Gorgons, Knots, and Calendars

Copied from the Book of Kells, M. Snyder


This design from the Book of Kells depicts megalithic mathematics. The left indicates winter, the right summer. The outer dots represent the equinox., the upper center dot June or spring, the lower center dot autumn.





The knot on the left equals the number five, representing the pentagram. This is a pattern that can be accomplished by carefully tying a paper strip into a knot.










The knot on the right represents seven, or a seven pointed star, accomplished by tying a paper strip into two knots. 

These designs are associated with the Gorgons from the Bay of Biscay in Ireland, who are depicted with knotted, intertwining snakes on their heads, which image the mathematics of seasons, functioning like a calendar (Duncan-Enzmann). In contemporary mythology, Gorgons are described as monstrous beings, both deadly and cruel. Historically, they were navigators for megalithic mariners. 


The symbols imaged with this Gorgon, an emblem on a plate from Rhodos, 500 BC, are astronomical and testify to the ancient knowledge of navigation the Gorgons mastered: the lozenge (indicates latitudinal location; the lozenge shadow changes shape in different locations), the Tau (symbolizing measurement of elevation of stars), and the swastika (symbol of atmospheric vectors, oceanic gyres, and movement of time). This is a navigational calendric. The Gorgon navigators were mostly women, thus the tradition of female figureheads on ships.


Gorgons are depicted with snakes on their heads, or sometimes with cauldrons which symbolize that these skilled navigators were also good cooks. Images like these begin the practice of imaging 'things on heads', such as serpents on the heads of the Pharaohs. The Vanir megalithic mariners were the first inhabitants of what is now Egypt, evidenced in images of the early Egyptian culture Zep Tepi, which means ‘first’.

About Symbologist Michelle Snyder


About Symbologist Michelle Snyder

Michelle Snyder is a professor of mythology, and an author, publisher, speaker, and artist. She  did her post-graduate research at the University of Wales, decoding ancient and prehistoric symbolism, mythology, folklore, and fairy tales.  Her artwork has appeared in galleries from Massachusetts to California. Michelle is co-owner of White Knight Studio. 
Michelle Snyder
Non-Fiction - Symbology:
Symbology: Decoding Classic Images
Symbology: Decoding Symbols through History
Symbology: Fairy Tales Uncovered
Symbology: Art and Symbols
Symbology: Hidden in Plain Sight
Symbology: ReVision
Symbology: World of Symbols
Symbology: Secrets of the Mermaids

Michelle Paula Snyder
Fiction – Fantasy Wonder Tales:
The Fairy Tales: Once Upon a Time Lessons, First Book
Call of the Dragon and other Tales of Wonder
A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book one: The Lost Unicorn
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book two The Lost Mermaid
 A Tale of Three Kingdoms, book three The Lost Dragon